A Story About A Man, A Trail And The Life Before

I don’t even remember why I clicked on this story. It was in one of my digests simply listed as ‘One Heckuva Hike’. Mild curiosity was probably the culprit. But what started off as a beautiful story about the Appalachian Trail ended up going deeper into the human psyche than I ever expected.

You can read A Long Walk’s End here.

It’s long, but really, really worth the read. Especially if you’re a writer.

So go on. Dive in without knowing anything like I did. It will be much better that way. I’m just going to sit here for a while and wait.

Bored meh reaction gifs

Done?

Good.

Amazing right?

Not done? Fine, but here there be spoilers…

I’ve never been someone who reads a lot of non-fiction, but I have read a lot of crime non-fiction. I think it started in my childhood with the crime magazines my older cousin left out in her room. Back then, I’d read anything new I could get my hands on in a household that had books, but rarely bought new ones. The magazines were horribly violent, had pictures of crime scenes and were definitely not meant for a child still in primary school, but they were fascinating. I loved the way they related police investigations, even if they did give rise to my unfortunate ability to be terrified by just about any true crime story because, ‘it could happen to me’. However, those magazines were not particularly well-written. They were about shock and gore.

A Long Walk’s End is the exact opposite. It’s a masterpiece that uses some of the best tools of fiction writing. It just happens to be non-fiction. Truman Capote would be proud. I was blown away by how the writer suckered you in with this heart-warming story of Bismarck the hiker, only to bit by bit, mind-blowing twist after mind-blowing twist, peel away the layers of this affable man to reveal a sordid story worthy of the Coen brothers.

Even with few answers presented to us about motivations, the missing money, what really happened in Bismarck’s brain all those years, and what happened to his first wife, we have a story here that builds tension to revelations we never saw coming. Is Hammes guilty of the crimes the FBI suspects he committed? A trial will tell us eventually. Perhaps even fill in the blanks.

But it’s the way the writer wove the story out of the low-key, mostly unknown, laid-back and genteel life of those hikers that walk the Trail that really made it work. You come away feeling you’ve experienced something beautiful, peaceful and right. Something that makes you smell the pinecones and long for the vistas. That Hammes was part of this world–a valued, loved part of it–boggles the mind, even as it does nothing to diminish its pureness. You want to join that Trail. You want to escape. You want to remake your life and leave all the mistakes and trials and problems behind.

For a brief span of minutes, you can relate to what this man did and why. For an instant, you run away with him to this beautiful place where you can be anyone. Where you can start over.

It is a profoundly disturbing realisation and key to this article’s impact. If what the FBI believes happened is what happened, then Hammes is that most terrifying of villains. The guy next door. The monster that wears a normal-skin. The one you think is just like you, until you realise too late, he’s not even human.

I’m not surprised William Browning has won awards for his writing. It’s hard to spin captivating truths out of your imagination, as writers do. It’s even harder to do it when you’re writing about the real world, and your main characters will never fully be known to you.

I take my hat off to this piece of writing and to Mr. Browning. And I’d tell every writer, new or old, to read this and take a look at how drama, tension and stunning plot twists can work in fiction, and non-fiction, if you know how to wield theme, setting, pacing, characterization and revelation the right way.

It’s a lot harder than it looks, we all know that. But when someone gets it right, it’s looks so, so easy. And we should all take notes.

Feel free to let me know what you think in the comments.

Stay thirsty, my friends!

Punctuation Love, Or, There’s a Mark For That!

Was toddling around and found this old article about punctuation marks that are extremely specific, denote all sorts of useful stuff, but aren’t in wide use.

My favourite parts include:

9. SARCMARK

The SarcMark (short for “sarcasm mark”) was invented, copyrighted and trademarked by Paul Sak, and while it hasn’t seen widespread use, Sak markets it as “The official, easy-to-use punctuation mark to emphasize a sarcastic phrase, sentence or message.” Because half the fun of sarcasm is pointing it out [SarcMark].

10. SNARK MARK

This, like the copyrighted SarcMark, is used to indicate that a sentence should be understood beyond the literal meaning. Unlike the SarcMark, this one is copyright free and easy to type: it’s just a period followed by a tilde.

And…

Which I send out to all you faithful followers and readers of my blog.

Have fun finding out if there’s a mark for that!

Excerpt: The Nightward – A Boy Dances

It’s been a while since I proved I was working. So here is a little bit of my current Work In Progress to keep you warm for the weekend!

A burst of applause made her jump, and Viyella realized that her mother had reached the end of her speech.  When the noise died down, the Queen announced, “And now to Gaia’s bountiful feast, while we enjoy the entertainment graciously provided us by my sister Queen, Saline of Kadoomun, and brought here by the Lady Ashwin of Seat Jinn.” 

Her mother inclined her head in the direction of a frail looking young woman seated at the same table as Lady Ilene.  Next to her was a tall, thin Lord Consort, dressed in the white and gold of Kadoomun’s Court, which clashed with his bright red hair.  Viyella smothered a laugh and was surprised to find that his bright green stare sought her out in seconds.   

I hope he didn’t hear that.  Cheeks burning, she turned her attention to the slender young man who had stepped into the open space left between the stairs to the throne and the tables.  His entire body glittered with gold dust and he wore loose white pantaloons that billowed around his ankles.  The musicians began the soft strains of a folk song that made Viyella think of running through the high grass of the lands in front of the Court, and the boy began to move, sinuous as wheat in the wind. 

Entranced, Viyella leaned forward, aware that everyone in the Court had grown silent, captivated by the dipping movements of the golden arms, and the strength in the flashing golden ankles.  More than once, she caught the eye of the dancer–Did he smile at me?–and sometimes she held her breath as he twirled like thistledown in spring, or leaped high, like Dagens at play.  In that endless, powerful moment, she knew immediately she wanted to be a dancer and hold the emotions of others in the palms of her skillful hands. 

When the dance ended, the thunderous applause seemed to lift the roof higher to the heavens.  Everyone stood, some calling down blessings on the anonymous boy.  The Lord Consort of Kadoomun looked around, a strangely satisfied look on his face.   

“Wonderful, simply wonderful,” Viyella heard her mother breathe, and below that, the murmur of agreement from her father.  She continued to clap her hands together, ignoring the stinging that had set in.  The boy bowed deeply to the throne, and then his head raised and his pale eyes settled on Viyella. 

Come.  The voice twisted around her mind, seeped into her muscles.  Come.  Viyella gasped and trembled before the power of the plea; she tried to form a thought and failed.   

Come. 

Something clanged to her right.  She sensed Dagen turn his head to the sound, and Captain Freehold moved to investigate it.  Dimly, she acknowledged that she was moving toward the stairs, still clapping.   

“Viyella?” Her mother’s voice sounded far, far away, drowned out by the whispered plea.  Come to me. 

Something glimmered by the boy’s right hand.  He’s holding a candle?  A torch?  It did not matter. All that mattered was that she obey.  She started to walk faster, her small feet almost tripping on the final stair. 

The boy raised his arm, still smiling, the glimmering thing beginning to take shape now. 

Viyella! 

The thought slammed into her, smashing the command in her mind like glass.  Dagen?  A shout carried across the Court.  She groaned, holding her head and dropped to her knees.  Something went by over her head in a rush of wind, the force so great it tilted her back and to one side. She was forced to put out her hand to steady herself.  She twisted, blinking, and felt her mind clearing, sunlight breaking through mist.  Dagen stood on the stairs, arm back over his shoulder with his sword raised for the throw–but then Viyella saw her mother and that was when she screamed. 

Her mother was staring, bewildered, at the silver spear jutting out of her stomach. She touched her hand to it gently.  Then, red blooming on her pink sari, Queen Elise crumpled to the floor.  

Omg reaction gifs

Have a great weekend!

Stay thirsty, my friends ;-)

Meme Explosion: The Written Word

Last week was for the TV shows. This week, we will have fun with books, reading and writing. So without further ado, some of my favourite memes from my Pinterest site that have to do with the written word!

Hehe:)

Waterstones, London, UK | 15 Hilarious Bookstore Chalkboards

Thesaurus

I often frequently commit this sin repeatedly, regularly, and time after time :)

Seriously...

I've done this!!

I know this feeling...

What Is This

Fact.

Stray books

Not bad agreement reaction gifs

Stay thirsty, my friends!

Trinbagonian Words And Phrases For the Expert Tourist

Some of you may have seen this clip of John Oliver calling out Jack Warner over the FIFA bribery scandal:

Needless to say, it did not necessarily go over well with all the citizens of my country. Many of us are embarrassed by the whole Warner thing, and some people felt Oliver was using our own language to mock us. Although I respect that view, I was more amused by his use of our slang. It had clearly been fact-checked by a Trinibagonian. That was, as I remarked on Twitter, advanced level Trini slang. Not the sort of thing you can grasp if you search Google for inspiration, or spend a week here.

However, I’m sure most people had no idea what he was saying. So this fun post was born, in which I break down the words and phrases used here, as well as throw in a few others for emergencies.

  • “Family, watch meh for ah minute nah.”  –  Family is a general greeting for strangers. Yes, I know, but that’s what it means. You would never refer to your real family by that word as a greeting. In fact, most people consider it slightly insulting if used–as it usually is–by men to draw the attention of a woman they find attractive (“Family, yuh looking nice”), but can also be used as a unisex word. When Trinis say ‘watch meh’ they mean, ‘pay attention’. We also like to say ‘listen nah’ for the same reason. ‘Ah minute’ is our standard phrase for a short time, and ‘nah’ is a general addendum that is just for emphasis (like, ‘you hear’ might be for an American Southerner). However, in other cases, it means no.
  • “Whas the scene?” – How are you? How are you doing? What’s going on with you? What’s going on here? What’s happened with you since I saw you last?
  • “I know yuh getting tabanca right now.” – Tabanca is a word to describe love-sickness, or the general malaise of someone who has lost their love and is deep in despair. It has come to mean anyone who’s in a deep depression over an issue, usually–but not limited to–affairs of the heart. Here, the tabanca is over the whole Warner / FIFA issue, of course. You can say someone ‘has tabanca’, but we also say they’re ‘getting’ it.
  • “Real dotish, ent?” – Really stupid. ‘Ent’ is another way to say, ‘right’, but with an emphasis on the word as though you are asking a question instead of stating a fact.
  • “Buh aye aye…” – Here, the last too words should be pronounced as though saying the first letter of the alphabet twice, only drawn out slightly. It’s a general phrase for ‘what the hell?’ or ‘what is this?’
  • “Doh hut yuh head.” – Don’t worry about it. Don’t worry over it. Don’t think about it.

And for extra credit:

  • “One time” – Immediately. As in, ‘I leave one time.’ This is also usually used in conjunction with ‘buss out’, which means to leave somewhere in a hurry. A common phrase is, ‘When I hear dat, I buss out one time.’
  • “Doux-doux” – Pronounced ‘do-do’, it means sweetheart, or honey and is derived from French patois. This one is less commonly used now than in years past. Your grandmother, or great aunt, is more likely to call you it than your significant other.
  • “Macajuel Syndrome” – The macajuel (ma-ca-WELL) is a large snake that lives in Trinidad and Tobago’s forests. Like all snakes, when it eats a particularly large meal, it will lie in one spot for hours or days, unable to move, in a type of lethargy until the meal is digested. When Trinbagonians say this, they are referring to sleepiness, particularly the sleepiness that comes over people after a large meal, or just after noon. We will say, ‘How yuh looking sleepy so? Like yuh have Macajuel Syndrome?’
  • “Lime” – Although we do have the citrus fruit, this is also a verb here, meaning to hang out or party. Someone will say, ‘Ah going an lime by my cousin in Couva. Coming back later.’
  • “Badjohn” – Someone you don’t want to mess with. A criminal or bully, or just someone who thinks they’re tough. Pronounced by running ‘bad’ and ‘john’ together quickly as one word, with the emphasis on ‘bad’.

And that’s it for now! I might do this again if people like it. Heaven knows we have enough slang to fill many, many posts ;-)

In the meantime, enjoy a little bit of Trini music to ‘lighten the scene’ (make things fun):

Stay thirsty, my friends!

Writers Write Different

A while back, there was a conversation on one of my email lists about an award-winning author who had announced her intention to quite the publishing game. I can’t remember her name (it was QUITE a while ago) but I remember she was a British literary writer who had won awards. Her problem, as far as I can remember, was that she felt she couldn’t produce her best work within the timeframe and pressure of publishing deadlines. She was a fairly slow writer who took years to get to the end of a manuscript and the pressure of deadlines was stifling her, so she announced she would no longer be publishing.

What surprised me was the vitriol on my list toward her. I wasn’t participating on the list at the time, due to some deadlines of my own, but I was reading the posts and every one of them went something like, ‘How dare she? I would kill for her publishing deal and the ungrateful [insert uncharitable phrase] is throwing all that away because she’s SLOW?!’ Followed by contemptuous recountings about how many books they could finish a year (ranging from two to one a month), and how she should just suck it up and stop whining.

Personally, I completely get how that writer felt. I’m fairly slow for a writer depending on what I’m doing. I’ve been working on one novel for several years, for example. LEX TALIONIS took me 6 months to write and another 6 months to edit to my satisfaction. It then took me several agent and publisher submissions and huge rewrites over several years to get it edited well enough to publish, but that’s another story. (Hint: You never stop editing. Never. The book will be on the shelf, available for sale for months and you’ll see another typo and pull your hair out.)

However, I also finished a book in one month once, and a story (which I published) in a total of 2 hours writing time and about 3 hours editing time spread out over a week as beta readers responded. I’ve noticed that I wrote more, and faster, when I was younger and making a lot of mistakes, and that as I mature in the craft, I’m getting slower on the bigger projects (like series) and faster on the stand-alones (like stories).

My point is this: writers do not approach writing the same way. Writers write different. And sometimes, the same writer writes different. Some writers take 10 years to finish a novel, and I know a writer who once took 10 days. Some writers do better with deadlines, and some feel pressured and can’t produce at all under one. Some writers can be all of the above on different projects, or days. I’m like that. Sometimes a deadline helps me focus. Other times it paralyzes me. A famous writer once said, the best gift you can give a writer is free time. Without it, I feel pressured to get the housework done, or focus on my paying job, rather than give myself the time needed to write. I know from talking to other writers that I’m not alone.

Look, rather than let our petty jealousies about awards and publishing deals get in the way, let’s give ourselves permission to acknowledge and respect each other’s processes. The writing craft is hard, time intensive and doesn’t ever end. Anyone who has managed to get a book out of it deserves respect. Anyone who has managed to get someone else to pay for that book has accomplished a freaking miracle. And all of us could use support whether we get there or not.

Part of my process involves taking forever on some things, and finishing others in a flash. But quality is not determined by speed of production. A writer should not be condemned because they chose to be honest about the way the publishing world affects their craft or the way they get to a manuscript they feel proud of. In fact, writers can learn a lot from each other and the different ways we go about things. I know the best part of learning to write was all the time I spent reading and making friends with other writers on the OWW. I knew writers there who worked on books for years and others who worked on them for months. They were all eventually published. You know why? Because readers, publishers, agents–they only care about the work.

It would do a lot of beginning writers a lot of good to realise that’s all they should care about too. Criticizing people who already put themselves out there does no one any good and only serves to make you feel self-satisfied.

Here’s a better idea. Learn from other writers. Don’t repeat the mistakes you think they make. Do copy all the things they do right. Respect and support other writers. And most of all, keep writing the way that works best for you. Let the awards fall where they may and the criticism come from elsewhere because you are too busy being true to yourself.

In the words of Kid President, ‘Be Awesome!’

Because, life is too short, you know?

High five reaction gifs

Stay thirsty, my friends!

Meme Explosion: Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead

I’m a huge fan of both GOT and TWD.

And yes, I’m still a fan of Game of Thrones and waiting anxiously for next April, despite all the complaining about this season.

However, I can understand why some people are up in arms, so instead of getting into all the ways season 5 made you angry, let’s have some fun with some of my favourite memes from Pinterest. And since I have The Walking Dead to look forward to in October, let’s also look back at what made us fans of the Ricktocracy and beyond.

If you aren’t up to date on both shows, please leave now, because I will be indiscriminate about what memes I post and there may be spoilers.

Image result for this post is dark and full of spoilers gif

Game of Thrones:

#GameOfThrones Poor Robb Had No Idea | Red Wedding Meme | Game Of Thrones Memes and Quotes

10530941_802712156429201_6664864850444673209_n.jpg 288×720 pixels

Game of Thrones (TV series): What are the funniest Game of Thrones meme images? - Quora

JK Rowling vs George Martin haha aww... fuck I really have been trying not to attach myself to characters knowing they're probably gonna die in Game Of Thrones

Joffery Batman  Game of Thrones Memes. No wonder he looked familiar when I first saw him on game of thrones

Robb and Ned Stark, Renly Baratheon, Oberyn Martell... the list goes on.

Tyrion hates the dwarf jokes - Game Of Thrones Memes

(1) Game of Thrones (TV series): What are the funniest Game of Thrones meme images? - Quora

Game of Thrones funny meme. Daenerys and her brown eyebrows

The Walking Dead:

Carol - The Walking Dead funny meme

The Walking Dead S4 funny memes

30 Hilarious Walking Dead Memes from Season 4 from Dashiell Driscoll and Memes!

Rick on the phone: | 46 Things You'll Only Find Funny If You Watch "The Walking Dead"

the walking dead funny | Walking Dead Page 39 Images

LOL. I love this pin!!! I like how it brings humor into a situation that also shows that Daryll has grown. People are a product of how they were raised, so I can see how the brothers would both label Asians as "Chinese" out of ignorance. But I like how the show allows Daryll to evolve. It makes me love his character even more.

The Walking Dead more funny pics on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yourfunnypics101

Introducing the Walking Dead to other people LOL!

I'd have a box for Nutella.

The walking dead

carl

Glenn

And that’s all she wrote.

Stay thirsty, my friends!

Taylor Swift Is Alright With Me

I like Taylor Swift and I’m not ashamed to say it.

I don’t, in fact, think she writes bad music. I like her tunes, I rock out to them all the time, and her Bad Blood video was everything, dahling, just everything.

Does she sometimes come across as the branded version of every good American girl a good American guy ever lusted after in a John Hughes movie? Sure. But it’s not her fault she happens to be blonde, talented and beautiful. And good for her, she also comes across as someone who has a sense of humour about herself and doesn’t really let what others think of her change what she likes about herself. As a feminist, I enjoy seeing a young woman move through the world confidently, living life as exactly the kind of woman she wants to be, and although the music industry famously warps everyone, Taylor still seems to be the same kind of likable girl we met when she was in her teens, despite the best efforts of most tabloids. In that, at least, she has beat out Miley, Lindsey, Hilary and a bunch of others.

However, what really made me like her recently is her stand against not being paid for what she does. Few artists have used their likability and success to actually stand up for principles that benefit the little guy. Most just use it to bankroll themselves. But twice now, Taylor has taken a stand against systems in the music industry that don’t pay performers properly for music. Withholding her massively popular album has served to spotlight practices at Spotify. And now, she has done the same thing with Apple, who intended to withhold royalties from artists whose tracks were downloaded during a user’s free three month trial period. Her latest stand against Apple was brilliantly explained. Apple does not give away its services for free, so they should not ask performers to do so. Only someone possessing no heart could fault it.

I never thought Apple had a heart (or rather, if it had one, it was a monstrous, misshapen entity, made up of the madly beating nerd hearts that gave out while standing in line for the newest variation of iPhones and iPads). But heart or not, they actually responded to her elegantly stated position by changing theirs.

This is big. Really big. Because for too long now, the internet has encouraged an entire generation to believe that entertainment should be free. Piracy is rampant in the music, publishing and film industry and in order to combat it, some industry leaders have tried and failed to plug leaks, while others have simply made as much content as possible free, at least for a time.

Giving away work for free is not a solution. What it does is enrich corporations, who can wait for profits, while seriously hurting artists, who are often on the bread line before they see a penny back from those long hours in a garage putting together demos and tracks. In the case of writers, it takes years to get novels done, and we already get paid a fraction of the sticker price of our own work unless we jump on board the Smashwords and Apple train, or sell our soul to sites like Amazon.

Problem is, Amazon is also a big company who can wait for profits. So it does things like arbitrarily reduce royalties on audio books after buying up Audible. Or change the rates on a programme because writers, you know, joined it. It can change the way it decides to price or market your book in KDP select without any consultation.

This basic disrespect of content creators comes in part from the false ideas that everyone can be a writer, and readers will pay for any book because they don’t care where they came from, they just care about the book. That’s not true anymore, if it ever was. Frankly, not everyone can be a GOOD writer, and most readers would like to pay for something that’s good.

There is some evidence that ebook sales are leveling off. More importantly, self-publishing and making money from it are not, and have never been, the same thing. Still, every writer should choose the path to publication they are most comfortable with because every path has drawbacks and positives. For me, not getting paid has never been something I’m comfortable with. I love writing. I want to do this full time. But I have a family who depends on me. If writing doesn’t pay my bills, I will have to try something else and let writing remain a beloved hobby. I’d rather not do that.

The creation of content, written, audible or visual, demands real money, time and work. Just because you can get something without paying, doesn’t mean it cost nothing to make. Artists deserve to be paid for it the same way everyone else gets paid for their work. Deciding that because it’s on the internet it should be free is simply a way of saying you don’t care what it takes to create content and you don’t want any more of it. If you like something, the only way for an artist to produce more is if they can feed themselves and their family doing it. If they can’t do that, why should you expect them too keep feeding your hobby? To keep entertaining you for free?

So I’m with Taylor. If you want to give people a free trail, do so by all means. But bear the cost yourself. Don’t ask artists to do it. If you want to enjoy an ebook, or music, or a film, consider buying it first. Respect the creator enough to acknowledge their right to earn a living from their own work.

But if you really can’t do that (writers and musicians are just a subset of broke people, after all), then at least advocate for what you love. Help boost the signal. Leave reviews for books on Amazon and Goodreads. Tell friends about your favourites. Someone with the money to buy the product might see your review and give a new artist a chance.

Support your habit. Support artists. Pay it forward. Because I suspect Taylor Swift is totally down with that too.

Taylor Swift Zendaya animated GIF

Stay thirsty my friends!

How Is Freaking Out Over Every Little Thing Supposed To Help Us? Answer: It Won’t.

I’m no shrinking violet. And I’m certainly not someone afraid to call anyone out on truly unacceptable behaviour, no matter what it is.

But I am starting to think that society is spending a lot of time freaking out, admonishing individuals and being voyeurs, while missing the big picture.

If I’m offended by something someone did, or said, I’ll talk to them. To their face and in private, if possible. We can go from there depending on what the problem was and how we get along while resolving it. But I find my stomach turning a bit these days at how easy it is to get people to Rage Against the Machine. Readers attack authors, movie fans bash directors, celebrity watchers search for the most unflattering news and pics of entertainers, just to make fun of people who already spend most of their day trying to look and act perfect in the hope that they’ll be allowed to work and pay their bills.

And it’s not just the internet. If all this stuff was just on the internet, I’d be okay with it, but the media seems bent on promoting this nonsense as well. Growing up, the news was about local, foreign and sports. You found out about the important stuff that had happened that day to change the world, for better or worse. Now, the news is sports and a bunch of celebrity and human interest stories squashed in between local crime reports and 5 mins of foreign headlines.

That’s ridiculous. The world is changing before our very eyes, morphing into something brand new that we don’t understand yet. There are wars on almost every continent and governments making huge decisions every day that will change the very nature of our society. We have economic inequality and poverty even though we have more than enough money and food to feed everyone. It’s 2015 and most people don’t trust their police or their politicians. And we still live in a world where despite being in the majority in terms of global populatio, people of colour are referred to as ‘minorities’. In short, it’s chaos and confusion and a struggle for growth and order every day.

Can we really afford to take our focus and our anger and our frustration and need for solutions and waste them fretting over whether a TV show reflects a book enough or not? Or whether our favourite author shares our political views? Or whether someone who made a sexist comment is really sexist or just considered their words badly? Is that really where our rage and desire for change should be directed?

Because I believe we’re allowing our petty minds and our profit-driven media to distract us from what really matters while the world around us is shaped by those who may or may not have our best interests in mind.

Maybe I’m being naive here, but I can’t help thinking about how much real, positive change we could effect if we decided to freak out over the big things the way we do over the little things.

My two cents and worth what you paid for it.

Sushi-Burritos Taste Amazing!

You’ve never heard of them? Well allow me to introduce you to them.

I just had one of these last month, while I was out with my sister at one of our new favourite restaurants, Samurai. So I can tell you it’s definitely available outside of California and New York.

Also, they’re right. It’s helladelicious. One of the best things I ever put in my mouth.

Here’s a pic of the one I ate, which I tweeted. And some other stuff we had that day.

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Ummm…those shrimp were tasty. And in the background, that’s a watermelon Smirnoff. Had no idea it came in that flavour. Definitely an improvement over the acidic original flavours.

And now I’m hungry.

Off to eat!

Stay thirsty (and hungry!) my friends ;-)